How to find the length of the third side of a triangle


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Posted by tutorsarenumber1@wmconnect.com (205.188.208.104) on July 16, 2003 at 01:56:53:

In Reply to: Help Algebra 1 Problem!!! posted by on May 29, 2003 at 18:43:47:

The Pythagorean theorem deals with the lengths of the sides of a right triangle.
It is often written in the form of the equation:
a^2 + b^2 = c^2
The theorem states that:
The sum of the squares of the lengths of the legs of a right triangle ('a' and 'b' in the triangle shown below) is equal to the square of the length of the hypotenuse ('c').

The Pythagorean Theorem has to do with the lengths of the sides of a right triangle. A right triangle is any triangle which has one right angle (an angle of 90 degrees). If the sides next to the right angle are of lengths a and b, and the third side is of length c, then (a*a) + (b*b) = (c*c). When people say this, they say, "a squared plus b squared equals c squared because when you multiply a number by itself like a*a, you call it a squared. This can be written as a^2. Some numbers that work in this equation are, 3,4, and 5, and 5, 12, and 13 So if you are told that you have a right triangle whose sides are 3 and 4, then you can use this theorem to find out what the third side is.


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